2018

Published Apr. 9, 2018 12:01 PM

Scientists recently discovered there is not one but four distinct species of giraffe, based on their genetic differences. These findings overturned century old accepted knowledge about a well known species, and may spur renewed efforts to save their threatened populations. Such "camouflaged" biodiversity – or cryptic species – may account for a substantial part of the world's biodiversity. However, searching for processes involved in "hidden" diversity is a daunting task, especially when no consensus even exist for what a cryptic species really is among researchers. A multidiciplinary team of scientists from the Natural History Museum in Oslo has taken on the challenge and proposes a new framework that provides researchers with common grounds in their hunt for biological processes underlying cryptic biodiversity.