News

Published Apr. 9, 2018 12:01 PM

Scientists recently discovered there is not one but four distinct species of giraffe, based on their genetic differences. These findings overturned century old accepted knowledge about a well known species, and may spur renewed efforts to save their threatened populations. Such "camouflaged" biodiversity – or cryptic species – may account for a substantial part of the world's biodiversity. However, searching for processes involved in "hidden" diversity is a daunting task, especially when no consensus even exist for what a cryptic species really is among researchers. A multidiciplinary team of scientists from the Natural History Museum in Oslo has taken on the challenge and proposes a new framework that provides researchers with common grounds in their hunt for biological processes underlying cryptic biodiversity.

Published Dec. 5, 2017 4:48 PM

In conjunction with awarding International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize, a ceremonious presentation of seeds from Hiroshima Peace Trees took place at the Natural History Museum in Oslo. 

Published Oct. 31, 2017 2:08 PM

The Natural History museum is renovating the entrance hall of the geological and zoological exhibitions. These exhibitions will therefore be temporarily closed for visitors, lasting from 30 October until December 27. 

The Botanical Garden, Museum Store, green houses and the exhibition at Tøyen hovedgård will be open as usual. 

Published Sep. 15, 2017 10:44 AM

Are you the new Research Director at the Natural History Museum? Apply by October 1st. 

Lotusblomsten folder seg snart ut i Victoriahuset
Published July 4, 2017 2:58 PM

The lotus is now blooming. View the spectacular flower in Victroriahuset of the Botanical Garden.

Published May 4, 2017 2:28 PM

Large-scale research project in molecular plant identification, led by NHM researcher Hugo de Boer, is granted 40 million NOK from the European Union.

Published Jan. 26, 2017 2:29 PM

 

Researchers from the Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, just finished describing a 144 million years old ichthyosaur from Svalbard. It is a new genus and species, published in PLOS ONE January 23rd 2017.

Published Dec. 2, 2016 11:31 AM

Assoc. Prof. Lee Hsiang Liow at the Natural History Museum and the Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo has been awarded an European Research Council Consolidator Grant (ERC CoG) by the European Research Council for her project macroevolution.abc. The awarded 1.99 million Euros will allow her to erect a model system for studying long-term evolutionary dynamics.